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Homeschoolers face 23 yrs. in jail for late paperwork

Homeschoolers face 23 yrs. in jail for late paperwork

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Parents from two homeschooling families in Ohio face up to 23 years in jail for missing filing deadlines imposed by the state. Despite the fact that each of the families were relatively new to homeschooling in Ohio — along with hundreds of other families around the country who report having trouble navigating their state’s notice requirements for the first time each year — school district officials filed criminal complaints against them.

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Peter Wood’s Shaky Architecture of Academic Freedom

Peter Wood’s Shaky Architecture of Academic Freedom

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Peter Wood, president of the National Association of Scholars, has written a detailed 11,000-word theoretical account of what academic freedom means. In response, I want to examine some of his arguments in detail, although I don’t have time and space to address every point. But fundamentally, I think Wood takes academic freedom for a wild ride across history, theory, and some specific concerns of conservatives today.

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Karl Marx the Most Assigned Text at Michigan Colleges

Karl Marx the Most Assigned Text at Michigan Colleges

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

According to the Open Syllabus Project, a database of over 1 million college course outlines from the past decade, Karl Marx’s “The Communist Manifesto” is the most frequently assigned book on Michigan college campuses. The book appears in the syllabi of 90 Michigan college courses, nine more than “Frankenstein,” by Mary Shelley.

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Condom-Nation Hits Middle Schools

Condom-Nation Hits Middle Schools

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Debra J. Saunders – The San Francisco Unified School District’s board is poised to expand its Condom Availability Program for high school students into middle schools. The school district no longer offers Algebra I as an eighth-grade course — Algebra I has been folded into a two-year, eighth-grade and ninth-grade class that is supposed to be more comprehensive.

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Required elementary school recess, activity bills that would allow less phys. ed. advance in Virginia

Required elementary school recess, activity bills that would allow less phys. ed. advance in Virginia

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

WASHINGTON — Virginia’s House and Senate have approved bills that would require an average of 20 minutes of recess or other physical activity per day for elementary school students. The slightly differing bills would each amend an existing requirement for a physical fitness program available to all students.

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DO LEARNING STYLES DETERMINE GRADES?

DO LEARNING STYLES DETERMINE GRADES?

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Tracy Packiam Alloway, Ph.D., is a psychologist based at the University of North Florida. Formerly, she was director of the Center for Memory and Learning in the Lifespan, U.K.

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Professor Who Expressed Solidarity With Muslims Will Leave Wheaton of Illinois

Professor Who Expressed Solidarity With Muslims Will Leave Wheaton of Illinois

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Wheaton College of Illinois and Larycia A. Hawkins, an associate professor of political science whom the evangelical Christian institution was seeking to fire over a theological dispute, “have reached a confidential agreement under which they will part ways,” the college and Ms. Hawkins announced on Saturday in a joint statement.

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BU Evening Classes Canceled

BU Evening Classes Canceled

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

With the National Weather Service warning that up to seven inches of snow may fall on the Boston area by Monday evening, accompanied by wind gusts of up to 40 miles per hour, BU administrators have canceled evening classes on the Charles River Campus, including Metropolitan College classes. Medical Campus classes at the School of [ ]

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Ed Dept announces new requirements for accreditors

Ed Dept announces new requirements for accreditors

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Department of Education has announced another set of new requirements for accreditors, following up on executive action in November that increased transparency around student outcomes. Inside Higher Ed reports the new requirements will compel accreditors to give more and better-organized …

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Will the Internet remove traditional higher ed’s prestige factor?

Will the Internet remove traditional higher ed’s prestige factor?

| February 10, 2016 | Reply

Michael Kinsley writes for The Washington Post that the Internet may be higher education’s great disruptor, bringing down traditional institutions by taking away the power of prestige. The prestige factor that enshrines the nation’s most elite institutions comes with the selective admissions process, but when anyone can access the course content offered to the privileged few, Kinsley posits the $200,000 education may not seem so worth it.

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